ROAR Gathers Veterans' Opinions

veterans survey

by Levi Newman on January 6, 2011

Ever wonder just who cares if your local VA office runs slowly, or if anyone tells other veterans to visit your office because gives exemplary care and attention to its cases?  The American Legion is doing just that.  The Legion’s Veterans’ Affairs and Rehabilitation staff has launched ROAR.  ROAR, or Regional Office Action Review, is a study undertaken by the Legion to find out what veterans think of their local VA offices.

The Legion has set up a way for you, as a veteran, to participate.  All that is needed from veterans is to fill out the online survey available on the Legion’s website.  This survey asks questions pertaining to your access to your VA office, and your satisfaction with its ability to handle your claim along with the myriad of other claims also flowing in.  Most questions are simply multiple choice, where the respondent picks the best applicable answer, but because these do not always fit just what needs to be said, there is also a free response box.  In this box, you can tell about your experience with your VA office.   It does not matter if you are happy, unhappy, or right in the middle, the Legion wants to hear what you have to say.  The information collected will be used by the Legion team when they visit the VA offices to assist them in their research.

Even though your name and email address are required to submit the form, there is an option to check if the Legion has permission to use your comments, and if they can use your name along with your comments.  You can also deny them all permission, and remain completely anonymous.

To assist the American Legion in their efforts to help you, visit the ROAR page, and take approximately ten minutes to fill out their survey.

Photo thanks to dreyboblue under creative common license on Flickr.

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Thomas Jaffarian January 7, 2011 at 7:08 pm

All the medical care is good, but the VA is missing the bigger picture . If they would look at “quality of life” for disabled veterans. They would save millions by making things like bicycles, gym memberships, etc avaialble they would save huge amounts in medical care & supplies.

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Robert Stretch January 7, 2011 at 10:24 pm

Great point Thomas, I couldn’t agree more.

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