GI Bill’s Transfer of Educational Benefits

by Levi Newman on June 21, 2010

Men and women in the armed forces have an incredible opportunity to give a loved one an education. With restrictions, the Post 9/11 GI Bill allows career servicemen and women the ability to pass their education benefits on to spouses or children. Now, no unused education will go to waste.

Who is Eligible

Any officer or enlisted member of active duty or Selected Reserve (basically any member of the Armed Forces) is able to transfer their benefits if they have already served 10 years of active duty, or if they have served at least six years already and commit to serve 4 more. Those who will be eligible for retirement between now and August 2013 can qualify without any further commitment, as retirement eligibility entails that they’ve already completed 20 years of service. If eligible to transfer your benefits, you can transfer them to your spouse spouse, your child, multiple children, or any combination spouse and children.

The Benefits

Service members are entitled to 36 months of education, and they can transfer whatever unused months they have to eligible beneficiaries. However, restrictions do differ depending on whether the beneficiary is a spouse or a child.

Spouses
o Benefits can begin immediately if wanted and stay valid for up to 15 years after the service member’s active duty ends
o Cannot receive the monthly stipend or book and supply stipend while the service member is on active duty

Children
o Service member must have completed at least 10 years of active duty before benefits can begin
o Must be 18 years of age or have a diploma from a secondary school (or an equivalent certificate)
o Not subject to the 15-year benefit expiration, but cannot use the benefits once past 26 years of age
o Can receive the monthly stipend or book and supply stipend while the service member is on active duty

Don’t let an education go to waste! For more information, visit the Department of Defense’s TEB page.

Photo thanks to CliffsPics under creative common license on Flickr.

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